Thank you for Smoking. The Unintended Consequences of Lucky Strikes

WTB-Fall-2016-28Black29-560x880On Dec. 8, Wesleyan will hold Wesleyan Thinks Big, a biannual TED-talk style event featuring Wesleyan faculty and administrators giving 10-minute speeches on an experience, a personal passion, an existential question or another topic of their choosing. The event will take place at 5 p.m. in Memorial Chapel.

This year’s event is being coordinated by Catherine Wulff ’18, with help from Rachel Godfrey ’19 and Kaiyana Cervera ’19.

“Wesleyan Thinks Big is a way to bring the community together outside of the classroom, by shedding light on the strength of personal testimony and human connection,” said Wulff. “Our main goal is for the audience to leave energized and hopeful.”

Wesleyan Thinks Big will feature:

  • Iris Bork-Goldfield, adjunct professor of German studies and chair of the German Studies Department: “Thank you for Smoking. The Unintended Consequences of Lucky Strikes;”
  • Danielle Vogel, visiting assistant professor of creative writing in English: “Narrative & Nest;”
  • Renee Johnson-Thornton, dean for the Class of 2018: “How to Excel in College by Cultivating Membership in a Community of Practice;” and
  • Khalil Johnson, assistant professor of African American studies: “Settler Colonial Blues: Musings from the Margins of Black and Indigenous History.”

“Second Class Refugees”: The Struggles of Lesser-Known German Jewish Writers in the U.S.


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Professor Krishna Winston’s talk “Second Class Refugees”: The Struggles of Lesser-Known German Jewish Writers in the U.S.  is the second event in our series “Germany Meets the U.S.” and will take place Wednesday, October 5th, from 4:30-5:30 p.m., in Fisk 208. Refreshments will be served.

Professor Winston will talk about German Jewish writers who had been quite well known in Germany but who struggled to establish themselves professionally when they emigrated to the U.S. and thus endured great economic and emotional hardship. Among them are Mehring, Hans Sahl, Curt Riess, and Heinrich Eduard Jacob. Her parents, the distinguished translators Richard and Clara Winston, knew these authors personally and translated their works into English. Krishna will draw on her collection of letters exchanged between these refugees and her parents as well as on her own memories.

Jewish Life in Germany Before and After the Holocaust

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We launch our series “Germany Meets the U.S.” next Friday, Sept. 23 in Fisk 208 from 12-1:00PM. There will be three short presentations on Jewish Life in Germany Before and After the Holocaust.

Thomas Reid ’18: Jewish and Christian Faith in Dialogue. Religious Thought in Germany in the Shadow of the Holocaust.

Sophia Shoulson ’18:  The Jewish History that I Didn’t Learn in Day School. Personal Reflections on a Semester in Germany.

Lisa Shepard ’17: “Was bist du denn?”  Reflections of a Mixed Identity in Germany.   (“So what are you then?”)

All three students spent a semester in Hamburg, Germany. Please announce this event to your students. Lunch will be served.

Wesleyan Students arrived in Hamburg, Germany

 

 

Frau Bork is visiting Wesleyan students who are studying at Hamburg University this spring and summer. 

From left to right: Sophia, Lisa, Thomas, Frau Bork, Jack, Hannah

Smith in Hamburg 
Full-year or spring only. The language requirement for the full-year program is GRST 214 or the equivalent. For the spring semester only, we require GRST 211 or the equivalent. Students will be able to take courses at Hamburg University and the Technical University. Please contact the German Studies faculty for more information.

 

 

Professor Bork-Goldfield presents her book in Potsdam, Germany

Mi 17.06.2015 | 19:30 | Brandenburg aktuell

Antistalinistischer Widerstand in Werder

1950 gründeten in WerRBBder Lehrlinge, Schüler und Studenten eine antistalinistische Widerstandgruppe. Sie verteilten Zettel gegen die ersten Wahlen zur Volkskammer. Sieben von ihnen wurden verhaftet und zum Tode verurteilt. Werner Bork floh in den Westen. Nun stellt er sein Buch über den Widerstand vor.

Brandenburg aktuell hat ihn bei einem Besuch in Werder getroffen.

Beitrag von Christoph Hölscher

In den POTSDAMER NACHRICHTEN heißt es, Werner Bork sei “ein ernstzunehmender Gegner”.

Krishna Winston on Günther Grass

Littera borealisKrishna Winston’s essay, “Was zu Günter Grass in der englischsprachigen Welt gesagt werden muss,” appeared in October 2014 in Volume 14 of Littera borealis, Edition zur zeitgenössischen Literatur im Norden, published by the Literaturhaus Schleswig-Holstein in Kiel. The Grass volume features an interview with the writer, conducted by the director of the Günter Grass House in Lübeck, and essays by a number of Grass’s translators. It was presented to Grass on the occasion of his 87th birthday.

Lutz Hüwel and Krishna Winston celebrating Germany’s Day of Unity

photoOn October 3, 2014, professors Lutz Hüwel and Krishna Winston were guests of Germany’s Consul General in Boston, Herr Rolf Schuette, for a celebration of Germany’s Day of Unity at the Legislative Office Building in Hartford, Connecticut. The reception highlighted the state of Baden-Württemberg, with which Connecticut maintains an official exchange focused on education and business. Since 1998, 50 Wesleyan graduates and graduate students have spent a year in Germany under the auspices of the exchange, and numerous students from Germany have come to Wesleyan. At an October 2 dinner at the Avon-Old Farms Inn, both professors were also present when the head of the visiting delegation from Baden-Württemberg, Minister of Higher Education, Research, and the Arts Theresia Bauer, presented a distinguished-service medal to Renate Seitz, who administers the B-W Exchange for the Connecticut Office of Higher Education.

Leo Lensing: Karl Kraus at war

“Die letzten Tage der Menschheit” by Deborah Sengl, 2013 Photograph: © Deborah Sengl/Photo by Mischa Nawrata
“Die letzten Tage der Menschheit” by Deborah Sengl,
2013 Photograph: © Deborah Sengl/Photo by Mischa
Nawrata

 

Leo Lensing’s commentary on Austria’s exploitation of The Last Days of Mankind, Karl Kraus’s great anti-war drama, to commemorate the hundredth anniversary of the beginning of the First World War, is featured this week on the homepage of the The Times Literary Supplement.