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Eat and speak German

Faculty Dining Room
USDAN im dritten Stock
Mittwoch, den 22. Februar
12.20 – 13.20 Uhr

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Panel discussion in conjunction with the exhibition

Changing Visions: Prints, Drawings, and Photographs during the Weimar Republic and After

Friday, February 17, 2017 at 12:00 noon
Fisk Hall, 262 High Street, Room 208

Speakers will include Erik Grimmer-Solem, Associate Professor of History; Ulrich Plass, Associate Professor of German Studies; and Krishna Winston, Marcus L. Taft Professor of German Language and Literature.

Moderated by Clare Rogan, Curator, Davison Art Center, and Iris Bork-Goldfield, Chair and Adjunct Professor, German Studies.

Lunch will be served and the panel discussion will begin at 12:20 pm.
The event is sponsored by the German Studies Department and Davison Art Center

Krishna-WinstonThe German Consul General will bestow the Order of Merit to Professor Krishna Winston on Monday, February 13. The Order of Merit, in Germany also referred to as the Bundesverdienstkreuz, was instituted by Federal President Theodor Heuss in 1951. It is the highest tribute the Federal Republic of Germany pays to individuals for services to the nation or contributions to enhancing Germany’s standing abroad and its relations with other countries. The Order of Merit may be awarded to Germans as well as to foreign citizens for achievements in the political, economic, social, or intellectual spheres and for outstanding service to the nation in the field of social, charitable, or philanthropic work. In awarding the Order of Merit, the Federal President wishes to draw public attention to achievements that he believes are of particular value to society in general. Krishna Winston will receive this honor for her excellent translations, her work with Fulbright, the German Exchange Board (DAAD), and the Baden-Württemberg exchange as well as for her advancing the role of German language and culture in the U.S. for many years.

Laudatio given by Mr. Ralf Horlemann, Consul General of the Federal Republic of Germany on February 13, 2017 at Wesleyan University.

 

Krishna Winston, the Marcus L. Taft Professor of German Language and Literature, translated The Screen Shot 2017-02-08 at 3.16.55 PMMoravian Night: A Story by German novelist Peter Handke. The American translation was published in December 2016 by Farrar, Straus and Giroux, New York.

Reviews of the translation have appeared in The New York Times, the New York Review of Books, and Kirkus.

WinScreen Shot 2017-02-08 at 3.14.14 PMston specializes in literary translation and has translated more than 35 works of fiction and non-fiction from Handke, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Günter Grass, Christoph Hein, Golo Mann, Rainer Werner Fassbinder and Hans Jonas. Her translations make available to the entire English-speaking world works originally written in German, and she has received three major literary prizes for her translations. She also was awarded the The Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany, the Bundesverdienstkreuz, by the President of the Federal Republic of Germany.

The Moravian Night, as summarized by the book’s publisher, explores the mind and memory of an aging writer, tracking the anxieties, angers, fears, and pleasures of a life inseparable from the recent history of Central Europe.

Mysteriously summoned to a houseboat on the Morava River, a few friends, associates, and collaborators of an old writer listen as he tells a story that will last until dawn: the tale of the once well-known writer’s recent odyssey across Europe. As his story unfolds, it visits places that represent stages of the narrator’s and the continent’s past, many now lost or irrecoverably changed through war, death and the subtler erosions of time. His story and its telling are haunted by a beautiful stranger, a woman who has a preternatural hold over the writer and appears sometimes as a demon, sometimes as the longed-for destination of his travels.

by Olivia Drake

To all our German students, and recent GRST graduates! Here is an exciting opportunity in German-English literary translation.  Applicants will translate a text from a contemporary German novel into English and compete to win a $2,500 prize.  Past winners have gone on to publish distinguished book-length translations. More information at: https://www.goethe.de/ins/us/en/kul/ser/uef/gut.html

The Gutekunst Prize for Emerging Translators is open to all translators under the age of 35 who, at the time the prize is awarded, have not yet published, nor are under contract for, a book-length translation. Applications will be accepted only from permanent residents of the United States. Team translations will not be accepted.

Each applicant is required to translate a literary text of approximately 18 pages, available on request from the Goethe-Institut New York. To receive the text and the application form, please send an email to: GutekunstPrize@newyork.goethe.org

The translation and application form must be mailed electronically to the Goethe-Institut New York by Friday, March 17, 2017 11:59pm EST. Full information on the submission procedure is included on the application form.

Translations will be submitted to a jury consisting of three experts in German literature and translation. The winner will be notified in early May 2017. The jury’s statement and the name of the winner will be published on the website of the Goethe-Institut.

The winner of the Gutekunst Prize will be invited to an award ceremony to take place at the Goethe-Institut New York. The $2,500 prize will be awarded at this time and the winner will have the opportunity to present his or her translation and network with professionals from the translation and publishing world.

WTB-Fall-2016-28Black29-560x880On Dec. 8, Wesleyan will hold Wesleyan Thinks Big, a biannual TED-talk style event featuring Wesleyan faculty and administrators giving 10-minute speeches on an experience, a personal passion, an existential question or another topic of their choosing. The event will take place at 5 p.m. in Memorial Chapel.

This year’s event is being coordinated by Catherine Wulff ’18, with help from Rachel Godfrey ’19 and Kaiyana Cervera ’19.

“Wesleyan Thinks Big is a way to bring the community together outside of the classroom, by shedding light on the strength of personal testimony and human connection,” said Wulff. “Our main goal is for the audience to leave energized and hopeful.”

Wesleyan Thinks Big will feature:

  • Iris Bork-Goldfield, adjunct professor of German studies and chair of the German Studies Department: “Thank you for Smoking. The Unintended Consequences of Lucky Strikes;”
  • Danielle Vogel, visiting assistant professor of creative writing in English: “Narrative & Nest;”
  • Renee Johnson-Thornton, dean for the Class of 2018: “How to Excel in College by Cultivating Membership in a Community of Practice;” and
  • Khalil Johnson, assistant professor of African American studies: “Settler Colonial Blues: Musings from the Margins of Black and Indigenous History.”

Please join us this Thursday, November 17 at 8:00PM for the fabulous documentary German&Jews at the Powell Family Cinema. For more information about this documentary visit the website German&Jews.

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Oktoberfest

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Come and celebrate and try some

Wurst Sauerkraut, Kartoffelsalat (potato salad) and Apfelsaftschorle (sparkling apple juice)

at the German House on 65 Lawn Ave.,

on October 29, at 2-5 p.m.

sponsored by the German House and the German department

im Deutskaffee-kuchen-F2137201,id=04ebbe44,b=lecker,w=440,h=440,cg=cchen Haus

65 Lawn Ave

Wednesday, October 19 from 4:45-6:00PM

For more information, please contact

Ruby


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Professor Krishna Winston’s talk “Second Class Refugees”: The Struggles of Lesser-Known German Jewish Writers in the U.S.  is the second event in our series “Germany Meets the U.S.” and will take place Wednesday, October 5th, from 4:30-5:30 p.m., in Fisk 208. Refreshments will be served.

Professor Winston will talk about German Jewish writers who had been quite well known in Germany but who struggled to establish themselves professionally when they emigrated to the U.S. and thus endured great economic and emotional hardship. Among them are Mehring, Hans Sahl, Curt Riess, and Heinrich Eduard Jacob. Her parents, the distinguished translators Richard and Clara Winston, knew these authors personally and translated their works into English. Krishna will draw on her collection of letters exchanged between these refugees and her parents as well as on her own memories.

Converse in German as good as you can 🙂

Kaffee_Kuchen

decorate cupcakes, eat them and enjoy a cup of coffee!

65 Lawn Ave

Wednesday, September 21st, from 4:15-6:00PM

For more information, please contact

Ruby

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We launch our series “Germany Meets the U.S.” next Friday, Sept. 23 in Fisk 208 from 12-1:00PM. There will be three short presentations on Jewish Life in Germany Before and After the Holocaust.

Thomas Reid ’18: Jewish and Christian Faith in Dialogue. Religious Thought in Germany in the Shadow of the Holocaust.

Sophia Shoulson ’18:  The Jewish History that I Didn’t Learn in Day School. Personal Reflections on a Semester in Germany.

Lisa Shepard ’17: “Was bist du denn?”  Reflections of a Mixed Identity in Germany.   (“So what are you then?”)

All three students spent a semester in Hamburg, Germany. Please announce this event to your students. Lunch will be served.

COME AND LISTEN TO THE EXPERTS,

students who studied in Hamburg and Berlin

or attended summer programs and did internships in Germany

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GLOBAL STUDIES CENTER in FISK 201

Wednesday, September 21,2016 – 12-1PM

Lunch will be provided!

 

 

graduates

 

 

 

Hein Jeong ’16, a German Studies and Philosophy double major, wrote an honors thesis about thinking through Hegel, Marx, and Marcuse and asks, “How do we think and talk to inspire and guide actions that change our world?” The thesis is entitled, Dialectic of Thinking and Talking. Henny received the Scott Prize for her outstanding work in German Studies. In the fall, she was inducted into Phi Beta Kappa, and this summer she is spending time with her parents in California before embarking for Japan.

Miranda Haymon ’16, a German Studies and Theater double major, directed an adaptation of Slaughterhouse-Five and received the Rachel Henderson Theater Prize in Directing this year. She is spending this summer in Berlin before starting the Allen Lee Hughes Fellowship at Arena Stage in Washington, D.C., as their Directing Fellow.

Wy Ming Lin ’16, a German Studies and Neuroscience double major, received the German Studies Blankenagel Prize for his excellent work in German and a fellowship from the German Government to attend the prestigious Congress-Bundestag Youth Exchange Program for Young Professionals. This program pays for one year of living and educational expenses in Germany. He will most likely also do some work in the medical field.
Having completed an orientation week in Washington, D.C., in July and a follow-up in Budenheim, Germany, he is taking an intensive two-month German language course in Cologne, proceding placement in Saxony.

Arya Mistry ’16, a German Studies and Psychology double major received, the German Studies Blankenagel Prize for her excellent work in German. She has been accepted into the Master’s program at Christie’s in Art Business and Law and will be living in New York starting this summer.

Nicholas Selden ’16, completed a double major in German Studies and the College of Letters. He wrote his honors thesis on the German Expressionist artist Emil Nolde, for which he received high honors in GRST. Nick’s thesis is an examination of nationalism and the construction of German modernism in Emil Nolde’s work and the early German avant-garde between 1895 and 1912. Nick also received the Blankenagel Prize for his fine contributions to German Studies. This summer he will be spending time back home in California before deciding on next year’s plans.

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